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Young Himalayas Still Growing!


Young Himalayas Still Growing!
Photo Information
Copyright: Subhash Ranjan (sranjan) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 486 W: 63 N: 1870] (5722)
Genre: Landscapes
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-10-22
Categories: Mountain
Camera: Nikon D-200, Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8D AF ED, Hoya Cir. Polarizer 86mm
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-05-05 6:21
Viewed: 4509
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Himalayas are known to be youngfold mountains. Young, because these have been formed relatively recently in the earth's history, compared to older mountain ranges like the Aravallis in India, and the Appalachian in the USA. They are known as fold mountains because the mountains extend for 2500 km in length in a series of parallel ridges or folds.

The accepted theory about the formation of the Himalayas started to take shape in the year 1912 when German meteorologist Alfred Wegener developed his Theory of Continental Drift. According to Wegener, the earth was composed of several giant plates called tectonic plates. On these plates lie the continents and the oceans of the earth. The continents were said to have formed a single mass at one point in time. From this single mass, today's continents have "drifted" apart from each other over a period of millions of years.

We pick up the story about 250 million years ago. During this time, all the earth's land was a single super continent called Pangea, which was surrounded by a large ocean.

Around 200 million years ago (also known as the Middle Permian Period) , an extensive sea stretched along the latitudinal area presently occupied by the Himalayas. This sea was named the Tethys. Around this period, the super continent Pangea began to gradually split into different land masses and move apart in different directions.

As a result, rivers from both the northern Eurasian land mass (called Angara) and the southern Indian land mass (called Gondwana) started depositing large amounts of sediments into the shallow sea that was the Tethys. There were marine animals called ammonites living in the sea at the time. The two land masses, the Eurasian and the Indian sub-continent, moved closer and closer. Indian plate was moving north about at the rate of about 15 cm per year (6 inches per year).

The initial mountain building process started about seventy million years ago (or the Upper Cretaceous period) when the two land masses (or plates) began to collide with each other. As a result, the already shallow seabed rapidly folded folded and was raised into longitudinal ridges and valleys.

Soon afterwards, about 65 million years ago (Upper Eocene Period), came the second phase of mountain building. The bed of the Tethys started rising again. The sea retreated, and the sea bed was elevated into high mountain ranges.

Later, about 25 million years ago (Middle Miocene Period) came another mountain building period which led to the formation of the low Shivalik ranges. After this, periodic mountain building phases occurred as the Indian plate pushed against the Eurasian plates which led to the Himalayan ranges rising further. The last major phase occurred 600,000 years ago.

Although the phase of major upheaval of the Himalayas has passed, the Himalayas are still rising, albeit at a much slower rate. The Indian plate is continuously moving north at the rate of about 2 cms every year. Because of this reason the Himalayas are rising at the rate of about 5 millimeter per year. This means that the Himalayas are still geologically active and structurally unstable. For this reason, earthquakes are a frequent occurrence in the entire Himalayan region.

It has to be understood that it is impossible to detect the movement of the plates and uplifting of the Himalayas by casual observation. However, a modern technology called Global Positioning System (GPS) has made it possible to measure even such a slow movement of the plates.

The Alps in Europe are another example of a mountain chain that formed due to the collision of tectonic plates.

Argus, eng55, jaycee, goldyrs has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • Argus Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5087 W: 260 N: 15584] (50590)
  • [2009-05-05 9:48]

Hello Subhash,
An excellent capture of a Himalayan mountain view taken in superb lighting to show several ridges to give a fine perspective, the shade of blue indicating the distance from the camera with the snowy peaks breaking the sequence of blues from the sky.
Thanks for posting this together with an excellent note,
Best regards,
Ivan

  • Great 
  • eng55 Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1313 W: 42 N: 1976] (5892)
  • [2009-05-05 12:22]

Hi Subhash,
Excellent capture of this mountain.I liked exposure,lighting and composition a lot.
Thanks for posting.

  • Great 
  • jaycee Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2465 W: 10 N: 8043] (25458)
  • [2009-05-05 15:45]

Hi Subhash,

Excellent notes to go along with this interesting picture. We can easily see the folds or ridges below the snow capped peaks. A fascinating post.

Jane

Yet another exquisite shot, my friend Ranjan! Coming from the hills myself, this shot makes me very homesick out here in Delhi!
Very well done!@
Goldy

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