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Home Sweet Home (Part 2)


Home Sweet Home (Part 2)
Photo Information
Copyright: Mariani Jo (mj_treknature) (102)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-07-21
Categories: Insects
Camera: Canon 300D, Canon EF 100 mm F2.8 Macro USM
Exposure: f/5.0, 1/80 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-09-08 1:01
Viewed: 3886
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
In my previous photo, I shared this Weaver Spider when she started to make the web. In this picture, the web has been done.

About Golden Orb Weaver Spider:

The golden silk orb-weavers (genus Nephila) are a genus of spiders noted for the impressive webs they weave. Nephila consists of numerous individual species found around the world. They are also commonly called golden orb-weavers, giant wood spiders or banana spiders.

The name of the golden silk orb-weavers refers to the color of the spider silk, not the color of the spider itself.
Yellow threads of their web shine like gold in sunlight. Xanthurenic acid, two quinones and an unknown fourth compound contribute to the yellow color. Experimental evidence suggests that the silk's color may serve a dual purpose: sunlit webs ensnare bees that are attracted to the bright yellow strands, whereas in shady spots the yellow blends in with background foliage to act as a camouflage. The spider is able to adjust pigment intensity relative to background light levels and color; the range of spectral reflectance is specifically adapted to insect vision.

The webs of most Nephila spiders are complex, with a fine-meshed orb suspended in a maze of non-sticky barrier webs. As with many weavers of sticky spirals, the orb is renewed regularly if not daily, apparently because the stickiness of the orb declines with age. When weather is good (and no rain has damaged the orb web), subadult and adult Nephila often rebuild only a portion of the web. The spider will remove and consume the portion to be replaced, build new radial elements, then spin the new spirals. This partial orb renewal is distinct from other orb-weaving spiders that usually replace the entire orb web.

Typically, the golden orb-weaver first weaves a non-sticky spiral[1] with space for 2-20 more spirals in between (the density of sticky spiral strands decreases with increasing spider size). When she has completed the coarse weaving, she returns and fills in the gaps. Whereas most orb-weaving spiders remove the non-sticky spiral when spinning the sticky spiral, Nephila leave it. This produces a "staff paper" effect when the orb is seen in the sun: groups of sticky spirals reflecting light with "gaps" where the non-sticky spiral does not reflect the light.
(Source: Wikipedia)


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To aruntp: Thanksmj_treknature 1 09-08 18:28
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Critiques [Translate]

really nice sharpness and lighting. colorful spider.

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