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FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2008-05-18 16:54]

GORGEOUS shot, well-composed, excellent details, focus and color. Thank you for sharing this beautiful image, Bob. Nice to 'see' you.

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2008-01-08 12:36] [comment]

Am loving your views. I particularly like this shot - the graininess adds texture to the entire scene, the lighting is superb and your work continues to inspire. :)

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-11-29 19:13]

Nice perspective and angle. I like the muted colors and the very informative note keeps me in constant awe and wonder of this creation we live in. Thanks for sharing! :)

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-11-08 11:19] [comment]

Hi, Bob -

An urban legend or perhaps it is truth, states that the House Sparrow (sic) {Passer domesticus} and the European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) were brought to this country by a smallish group of people who wanted to bring 'every bird mentioned in Shakespeare's works' to the America's.

What took place on a cold morning in Central Park went allegedly thusly: caged members of both species and of both sexes, were released in numbers of ten or twenty, into New York's Central Park.

Not long afterwards, a close relative of Passer domesticus, the Eurasian Tree Sparrow, was released near St. Louis, Missouri. . .a small, isolated population of this latter species exists to this day in both St. Louis and in Illinois.

The House Sparrow (sic) is notorious for its aggressiveness in the removal of nests of native cavity nesters - an unusual adaptation to environments that have almost no trees - in its native Europe, the House Sparrow (sic) builds colony nests of domes made of dried grasses in trees. Here in the US, that is very rarely seen (I have seen ONE myself while living in Nevada; a small colony of House Sparrows {sic} set up residence in a few trees of a neighborhood I lived in at the foot of a mountain back in the mid 80s); instead, House Sparrows (sic) have become cavity nesters.

In the east, this means that the Eastern Bluebird has been in a major fight for habitat against this intrusive species.

In the west, we see them mainly in parking lots, nesting in lights, signs, under the eaves of roofs, etc.

In order to take over a nest from any species of Bluebird, the House Sparrow (sic) will simply build its nest over the top of the other species, suffocating the eggs (yes, eggs must 'breathe' in order to hatch). This can happen over and over again in a nesting season, as the rightful owner of the nest will make several attempts to reclaim their rightful nest cavity.

The reason I put (sic) next to House Sparrow is simple:

They are not true sparrows.

They are members of the Weaver family. :)

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-31 13:41] [comment]

Oh, MY. Excellent shot- I have no words to describe what I am thinking at the moment. Just awesome! :)

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-31 13:41]

Yes, Hermit Thrush,

Song Thrushes, (which is what mariki suggested it might be), aren't found in California or even the United States, for that matter. Song Thrushes are birds of Europe that look VERY MUCH like our North American Thrush species.

Song Thrush:

http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/s/songthrush/index.asp

Hermit Thrush:

http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i7590id.html

The reddish tail and the slight pattern on the wings of this bird in your photo (which is very well taken), fairly cinch the ID as a Hermit Thrush.

Well done!

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-31 13:36] [+]

Taken in California, it would be an Anna's Hummer. The date taken of November 26 cinches the ID as an Anna's. Ruby-throated's do not occur in California.

I personally like how the wing in the foreground is blurred with the motion of movement and how the bird itself is well-focused and sharp.

They are very hard to capture and you did it very well.

Thanks for sharing,

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-29 22:12] [+]

Ducks. The two birds behind the Canada Geese are *ducks* *LOL* Nice shot, tho, Bob! :)

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-29 22:11] [comment]

Ohhh, lucky YOU! I live in Mendocino County on the coast and have for over 21 years and have still not made the trek to this awesome beach. I KNEW as soon as I saw it that it was Bowling Ball Beach. Excellent shot; the lighting gives it an interesting glow. TFS.

Feather

FeatherBirdLady Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 28 W: 0 N: 82] (500) [2007-10-29 22:08] [comment]

Nice shot. Phalanges and eye shape suggest some kind of a thrush to me. . .