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Varecia variegata variegata


Varecia variegata variegata
Photo Information
Copyright: Paul Cornish (cornishpaul) Silver Note Writer [C: 0 W: 0 N: 23] (122)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2006-02-25
Categories: Mammals
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/200 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2007-10-11 11:14
Viewed: 4854
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
A black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) on the island of nosey mangabe. The black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) is one of the largest lemurs alive today. From the top of the head to the tip of the tail they can grow up to four feet long, but they only weigh eight or ten pounds. Both males and females look the same, with black and white markings and a ruff or fringe of long white fur around their ears and neck.

Black and white ruffed lemurs live in small groups. There are usually only two to five lemurs in each group. They all share a common home territory that they defend from neighboring groups. One way they do this is by using loud calls to let other lemurs know that they are there. They also work together to protect each other from predators. Boa constrictors, eagles and a predator called a fossa all like to eat the lemurs. If a lemur spots a predator, it makes a loud alarm call to alert the other members of its group. Members of a group also groom each other with their teeth. This helps to keep each lemur clean and to keep friendships strong in the group.

A black and white lemur mother will have two or three babies at once. Many other monkeys and lemurs only have one baby at a time. Black and white lemur mothers also hide their babies in a safe place. Many other monkeys and lemurs keep their babies with them all the time. When a baby is three weeks old, it starts to follow its mother around, and it can keep up with her when it is only seven weeks old!

Black and white ruffed lemurs live in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar. They eat fruit and other plants. Black and white ruffed lemurs are endangered because people are cutting down their forest homes in order to grow food. People also like to eat the lemurs.


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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • viv Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 292 W: 3 N: 653] (3317)
  • [2007-10-11 12:37]

Hello Paul,
What a nice cute animal, I have never seen a lemur so close, great details.
TFS
Vivian

  • Great 
  • jesst Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 368 W: 0 N: 172] (2441)
  • [2007-10-11 23:45]

Wonderful portrait, sharp and detail are amazing

Hi Paul
just perfect with lovely catchlight, great fill in flash perfect sharpness good compo and lovely animal
GREAT
tfs
tom

Hello Paul,
Very well done on the exposure and details.Sharpness and colour rendition also excellent.

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