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Big ears


Big ears
Photo Information
Copyright: Vivian Droog (viv) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 292 W: 3 N: 653] (3317)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-10-17
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Konika Minolta Dynax 7D, Sigma 170-500mm f/5-6.3 AF APO Ultra DG, Soligor UV
Exposure: f/11, 1/250 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2009-03-01 6:53
Viewed: 4566
Points: 5
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Here a female Kudu, I like the pose while she is eating, and as you know it looks like very easy to take this picture, but sitting in the car, you sometimes want to go up a little bit because there is a branche or something else in front of you.
I hope you like it.

Thanks Vivian



Physical Characteristics
Both the greater kudu and its close cousin the lesser kudu have stripes and spots on the body, and most have a chevron of white hair between the eyes. Males have long, spiral horns. The greater kudu's horns are spectacular and can grow as long as 72 inches, making 2 1/2 graceful twists.

Female greater kudus are noticeably smaller than the males. By contrast, lesser kudus are even smaller, about 42 inches at the shoulder; males weigh around 220 pounds while females generally weigh about 50 pounds less. Lesser kudus have smaller horns than the greater kudus and conspicuous white patches on the upper and lower parts of the neck. Although both species are bluish-gray, grayish-brown or rust color, the lesser has five to six more lateral white stripes, for a total of 11 to 15. Both species have a crest of long hair along the spine, and greater kudus also have a fringe under the chin
Behavior
Male kudu sometimes form small bachelor groups, but more commonly they are solitary and widely dispersed. Dominance between males is usually quickly and peacefully determined by a lateral display in which one male stands sideways in front of the other and makes himself look as large as possible. Males only join females, who form small groups of six to 10 with their offspring, during mating season. Calves grow rapidly and at 6 months are fairly independent of their mothers.

The pregnant female departs from her group to give birth, leaving the newborn lying out for 4 or 5 weeks, one of the longest periods of all the antelopes. The calf then begins to accompany its mother for short periods of time and by 3 or 4 months is with her constantly. Soon after, the mother and calf rejoin the female's group. Calves grow rapidly and at 6 months are fairly independent of their mothers.

Did You Know?
Their cryptic coloring and markings protect kudus by camouflaging them. If alarmed they usually stand still and are very difficult to spot.
Kudus normally restrict their movements to a small home range, but the scarcity of food in dry season may prompt them to roam more widely.


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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Vivian,
Great shot. Lovely composition.
Nice clarity and colour.
TFS.
Marx

very nice, but too crispy, perhaps you sharpened too much ? TFS Ori

I like your picture, but I think it has been sharpend a little too much!
regards
Pierre

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