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Mandarin Duck


Mandarin Duck
Photo Information
Copyright: John Coventry (jtcoven) Silver Note Writer [C: 0 W: 0 N: 18] (300)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-11-04
Categories: Birds
Exposure: f/9.0, 1/100 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2012-12-02 10:41
Viewed: 3117
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata), or just Mandarin, is a medium-sized, East Asian perching duck, closely related to the North American Wood Duck. It is 4149 cm long with a 6575 cm wingspan.

The adult male is a striking and unmistakable bird. It has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and "whiskers". The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange "sails" at the back. The female is similar to female Wood Duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill.[2] The Mandarin ducklings are almost identical in look to Wood ducklings, and appear very similar to Mallard ducklings. The ducklings can be distinguished from Mallard ducklings because the eye-stripe of Mandarin ducklings (and Wood ducklings) stops at the eye, while in Mallard ducklings it reaches all the way to the bill.

In Chinese culture

Mandarin Ducks, which are referred to by the Chinese as Yuan-yang (simplified Chinese: 鸳鸯; traditional Chinese: 鴛鴦; pinyin: yuān yāng), where yuan (鴛) and yang(鴦) respectively stand for male and female Mandarin Ducks.

In traditional Chinese culture, Mandarin Ducks are believed to be life-long couples, unlike other species of ducks. Hence they are regarded as a symbol of conjugal affection and fidelity, and are frequently featured in Chinese art.

A Chinese proverb for loving couples uses the Mandarin Duck as a metaphor: "Two mandarin ducks playing in water" (simplified Chinese: 鸳鸯戏水; traditional Chinese: 鴛鴦戲水; pinyin: yuān yāng x shuǐ). The Mandarin Duck symbol is also used in Chinese weddings because in traditional Chinese lore, they symbolize wedded bliss and fidelity.

Because the male and female plumages of the Mandarin Duck are so unalike, yuan-yang is frequently used colloquially in Cantonese to mean an "odd couple" or "unlikely pair" a mixture of two different types of same category. For example, the drink yuanyang and yuan-yang fried rice.

text courtesy of wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_Duck


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Critiques [Translate]

John,

Photographically beautiful. I would have removed the band with PP as it distracts from the beauty of this amazing duck. TFS

Mike

Hello John,
This is a very beautiful image. Yes, I agree with Mike about the leg ring. The DOF seems to be very shallow and it would have been difficult to get more DOF hand-held at that focal length. But, as I said, very beautiful as is. Best wishes.
Neels

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