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Love II


Love II
Photo Information
Copyright: Christos Saprikis (momos) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 57 W: 55 N: 171] (705)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2005-08
Categories: Insects
Camera: Canon 350D / Digital Rebel XT, Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM
Exposure: f/22, 1/200 seconds
Details: (Fill) Flash: Yes
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2006-02-27 13:23
Viewed: 4837
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The grasshopper's reproductive system consists of the gonads, the ducts which carry sexual products to the exterior, and accessory glands. In males, the testes consist of a number of follicles which hold the spermatocytes as they mature and form packets of elongated spermatozoa. After they are liberated in bundles, these spermatozoa accumulate in the vesicula seminalis (vas deferens).

In females, each ovary consists of ovarioles. These converge upon the two oviducts, which unite to create a common oviduct which carries ripe eggs. Each of the ovarioles consists of a germarium (a mass of cells that form oocytes, nurse cells, and follicular cells) and a series of follicles. The nurse cells nourish the oocytes during early growth stages, and the follicular cells provide materials for the yolk and make the eggshell (chorion).

During reproduction, the male grasshopper introduces sperm into the vagina through its aedeagus (reproductive organ), and inserts its spermatophore, a package containing the sperm, into the female's ovipositor. The sperm enters the eggs through fine canals called micropyles. The female then lays the fertilized egg pod, using her ovipositor and abdomen to insert the eggs about one to two inches underground, although they can also be laid in plant roots or even manure. The egg pod contains several dozens of tightly-packed eggs that look like thin rice grains. The eggs stay there through the winter, and hatch when the weather has warmed sufficiently. In temperate zones, many grasshoppers spend most of their life as eggs through the "cooler" months (up to 9 months) and the active states (young and adult grasshoppers) live only up to three months. The first nymph to hatch tunnels up through the ground, and the rest follow. Grasshoppers develop through stages progressively get larger in body and wing size. This development is referred to as hemimetabolous or incomplete development since the young are rather similar to the adult.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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This foto captured with a Canon 350D +Canon FS 60mm Macro
ISO 100
1/200 seconds
f:22
Built-in Flash

Pixmantec RawShooter premium 2006 + Adobe Photoshop Elements 3.0 (crop, sharpen, levels,selective color)

blue-velvet29, phlr has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Christos!
Lovely shot. Great pose ;-) Very good colors and composition. Well done!
TFS;-)
regards
Dorota

  • Great 
  • wuta Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 855 W: 2 N: 617] (2142)
  • [2006-02-27 14:15]

Hello Cristos ,a very beautiful shot ,nice compositie ,good sharpnes colours pov and dof ,good job thanks ,greetings Teunie .

  • Great 
  • phlr Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1237 W: 130 N: 882] (2821)
  • [2006-02-27 15:38]

Great capture!
Nature on it's best!
Very good on details!
Very good on colours!
Excellent POV and DOF!
TFS!

Great macro! Colours are well saturated! Bravo!

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