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Tiger


Tiger
Photo Information
Copyright: Sharon Johnson (shazzy) Silver Star Critiquer/Silver Note Writer [C: 12 W: 3 N: 15] (171)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2011-03
Camera: Fujifilm Finepix 8000, Digital - JPG
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-04-21 9:20
Viewed: 3089
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Tiger
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the feline. For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation).
"Tigress" redirects here. For other uses, see Tigress (disambiguation).
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Tiger
A Bengal Tiger (P. tigris tigris) in India's Ranthambhore National Park.
Conservation status

Endangered (IUCN 3.1)[1]
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Felidae
Genus: Panthera
Species: P. tigris
Binomial name
Panthera tigris
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Subspecies

P. t. tigris
P. t. corbetti
P. t. jacksoni
P. t. sumatrae
P. t. altaica
P. t. amoyensis
P. t. virgata
P. t. balica
P. t. sondaica
Historical distribution of tigers (pale yellow) and 2006 (green).[2]
Synonyms
Felis tigris Linnaeus, 1758[3]

Tigris striatus Severtzov, 1858
Tigris regalis Gray, 1867

The tiger (Panthera tigris), a member of the Felidae family, is the largest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera.[4] The tiger is native to much of eastern and southern Asia, and is an apex predator and an obligate carnivore. The larger tiger subspecies are comparable in size to the biggest extinct felids,[5][6] reaching up to 3.3 metres (11 ft) in total length, weighing up to 300 kilograms (660 pounds), and having canines up to 4 inches long.[7] Aside from their great bulk and power, their most recognisable feature is a pattern of dark vertical stripes that overlays near-white to reddish-orange fur, with lighter underparts. The most numerous tiger subspecies is the Bengal tiger, while the largest is the Siberian tiger.

Tigers have a lifespan of 1015 years in the wild, but can live longer than 20 years in captivity.[8] They are highly adaptable and range from the Siberian taiga to open grasslands and tropical mangrove swamps.

They are territorial and generally solitary animals, often requiring large contiguous areas of habitat that support their prey demands. This, coupled with the fact that they are indigenous to some of the more densely populated places on earth, has caused significant conflicts with humans. Three of the nine subspecies of modern tiger have gone extinct, and the remaining six are classified as endangered, some critically so. The primary direct causes are habitat destruction, fragmentation, and hunting.

Historically, tigers have existed from Mesopotamia and the Caucasus throughout most of South and East Asia. Today, the range of the species is radically reduced. All surviving species are under formal protection, yet poaching, habitat destruction, and inbreeding depression continue to threaten the tigers.

Tigers are among the most recognisable and popular of the world's charismatic megafauna. They have featured prominently in ancient mythology and folklore, and continue to be depicted in modern films and literature. Tigers appear on many flags and coats of arms, as mascots for sporting teams, and as the national animal of several Asian nations, including India.[9]
See Dartmoor zoo for more info on this Tiger

www.dartmoorzoo.org

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Critiques [Translate]

great tiger portrait, TFS Ori

Hello Sharon!
Nice picture of a tiger, beautiful natural colors, too bad the light was not great.
Hello Nico

Hi Sharon,

Lovely majestic pose of this Tiger, good sharpness and detail throughout, unfortunately the light was not on your side,
But nevertheless a fabulous picture and very well done,
congratulations Sharon and have a wonderful Easter weekend,
Best Regards,

Pauly.

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