<< Previous Next >>

Peacock


Peacock
Photo Information
Copyright: Sion Roberts (irishprophet25) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 115 W: 21 N: 280] (1118)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-10-22
Categories: Birds
Camera: Panasonic Lumix FZ35, 46 mm UV Filter
Exposure: f/3.7, 1/125 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2009-11-18 10:50
Viewed: 2804
Points: 6
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
This is a peacock that I saw in the tree at the cotswold wildlife centre. There were a few there but I wasn't lucky enough to see the tail up. Hope you all enjoy

Taken from wikipedia:

Females are about 86 cm (34 in) long and weigh 2.754 kg (6-8.8 lbs), while males average at about 2.12 m (7.3 ft) in full breeding plumage (107 cm/42 in when not) and weigh 46 kg (8.8-13.2 lbs). The male is called a peacock, the female a peahen. The Indian Peacock has iridescent blue-green plumage. The upper tail coverts on its back are elongated and ornate with an eye at the end of each feather. These are the Peacock's display feathers. The female plumage is a mixture of dull green, grey and iridescent blue, with the greenish-grey predominating. In the breeding season, females stand apart by lacking the long 'tail feathers' also known as train, and in the non-breeding season they can be distinguished from males by the green colour of the neck as opposed to the blue on the males.
Peafowl are most notable for the male's extravagant display feathers which, despite actually growing from their back, are known as a 'tail' or train. This train is in reality not the tail but the enormously elongated upper tail coverts. The tail itself is brown and short as in the peahen. The colours result from the micro-structure of the feathers and the resulting optical phenomena. The ornate train is believed to be the result of female sexual selection as males raised the feathers into a fan and quiver it as part of courtship display. Many studies have suggested that the quality of train is an honest signal of the condition of males and that peahens select males on the basis of their plumage. More recent studies however, suggest that other cues may be involved in mate selection by peahens.
They lay a clutch of 4-8 eggs which take 28 days to hatch. The eggs are light brown and are laid every other day usually in the afternoon. The male does not assist with the rearing, and is polygamous with up to six hens.

nasokoun, boreocypriensis has marked this note useful
Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

Our photos are neighbors today! This photo of a peacock in profile makes him look very regal. I did a workshop to see if I could lighten up the colors a little bit.

TFS,
MP

hello Sion
a nice moment and composition by good POV, with different measurment of light the colours and the details would be elected!
keep photographing! TFS
Nasos

Hi and Good Morning Sion,

Wonderful capture of this male peacock on a horizontal tree trunk in a lovely pose. I quite like the 3-D effect here.
TFS and have a nice day!
Cheers,

Bayram

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF