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Dalli...I'm here..


Dalli...I'm here..
Photo Information
Copyright: Babak hendizadeh (timonejoon) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 177 W: 45 N: 224] (762)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-03-23
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon 30D, Canon 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 IS USM
Exposure: f/9.0, 1/250 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): The tits, chickadees. [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2007-04-05 13:05
Viewed: 4330
Favorites: 1 [view]
Points: 5
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Hi everybody
She makes many sounds and keep me waiting for 10min for showing up. I love her as she was playing around me.

Calls
The vocalizations of Black-capped chickadees are highly complex (Ficken et al., 1978). 13 distinct types of vocalizations have been classified, many of which are complex and can communicate different types of information. Chickadees' complex vocalizations are likely an evolutionary adaptation to their habitat: they live and feed in dense vegetation, and even when the flock is close together, individual birds tend to be out of each others' visual range.


Black-capped Chickadee, Iona Beach Regional ParkThe song of the Black-capped is a simple, clear whistle of two notes, identical in rhythm, the first roughly a whole-step below the second. This is distinguished from the Carolina chickadee's four-note call fee-bee fee-bay; the lower notes are nearly identical but the higher fee notes are omitted, making the Black-capped song like bee bay.

The males only sing the song when in relative isolation from other chickadees (including their mates). In late summer, some young birds will sing only a single note. Both sexes sometimes make a faint version of the song, and this appears to be used when feeding young.

The most familiar call is the familiar chick-a-dee-dee-dee which gave this bird its name. This simple-sounding call is astonishingly complex. It has been observed to consist of up to four distinct units which can be arranged in different patterns to communicate information about threats from predators and coordination of group movement. Recent study of the call shows that the number of dees indicates the level of threat from nearby predators. An analysis of over 5,000 alarm calls from chickadees, it was found that alarm calls triggered by small, dangerous raptors had a shorter interval between chick and dee and tended to have extra dees, usually averaging four instead of two. In one case, a warning call about a pygmy owl, a prime threat to chickadees, contained 23 dees (Templeton et al., 2005). The Carolina Chickadee makes a similar call which is faster and higher-pitched.

There are a number of other calls and sounds that these Chickadees make, such as a gargle noise which is usually used by males to indicate a threat of attacking another male, often when feeding. This call is also used in sexual contexts. This noise is among the most complex of the calls, containing 2-9 of 14 distinct notes in one population that was studied.
(from wikipedia)


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Critiques [Translate]

the head is underexposed but the rest of the picture is not wonderful
aleks

;)

  • Great 
  • arfer Gold Star Critiquer [C: 2731 W: 0 N: 0] (0)
  • [2007-04-05 23:02]

Hello Babak

A very nice shot of this black capped chickadee.It is very cute.Very nice details and colours.Well composed in the frame.TFS

Rob

  • Great 
  • EOSF1 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1393 W: 119 N: 5267] (23955)
  • [2007-06-01 12:53]

Hello Babak ! Really good shot of the Chickadee. Good background and good lighing. Thanks,

Mario

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