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Blue Heron


Blue Heron
Photo Information
Copyright: Yves Grenier (eev) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 64 W: 33 N: 66] (756)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-09-09
Categories: Birds
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2007-09-10 9:57
Viewed: 2918
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Great Blue Heron is found throughout most of North America, including Alaska, Quebec and Nova Scotia. The range extends south through Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean to South America. Great blue herons can be found in a range of habitats, in fresh and saltwater marshes, mangrove swamps, flooded meadows, lake edges, or shorelines, but they always live near bodies of water. Generally, they nest in trees or bushes that stand near a body of water. In general, what is shared in common is that all must be near or on a site of water for a living area (nest.)

It feeds in shallow water or at the water's edge during both the night and the day, but especially around dawn and dusk. Herons locate their food by sight and generally swallow it whole. Herons have been known to choke on prey that is too large. It uses its long legs to wade through shallow water, and spears fish or frogs with its long, sharp bill. Its diet can also include insects, snakes, turtles, rodents and small birds.

It is generally a solitary feeder. Individuals usually forage while standing in water, but will also forage in fields or drop from the air, or a perch, into water. As large wading birds, Great Blue Herons are able to feed in deeper waters, and thus are able to exploit a niche not open to most other heron species.

This species usually breeds in monospecific colonies, in trees close to lakes or other wetlands; often with other species of herons. These groups are called heronry (more accurately than "rookery"). The size of these colonies may be large, ranging between 5 500 nests per colony, with an average of approximately 160 nests per colony.

Great Blues build a bulky stick nest, and the female lays three to six pale blue eggs. One brood is raised each year. If the nest is abandoned or destroyed, the female may lay a replacement clutch. Reproduction is negatively affected by human disturbance, particularly during the beginning of nesting. Repeated human intrusion into nesting areas often results in nest failure, with abandonment of eggs or chicks.

Both parents feed the young at the nest by regurgitating food. Parent birds have been shown to consume up to 4 times as much food when they are feeding young chicks than when laying or incubating eggs.

Eggs are incubated for approximately 28 days and hatch asynchronously over a period of several days. The first chick to hatch usually becomes more experienced in food handling and aggressive interactions with siblings, and so often grows more quickly than the other chicks.

earthtraveler, parthasarathi has marked this note useful
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ThreadThread Starter Messages Updated
To earthtraveler: I agreeeev 1 09-15 15:59
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Critiques [Translate]

Hello Yves,
Good sharp detailed image of the Heron.
Fine natural color and POV.
IMHO the composition would be improved by having the open space in front of the Heron instead of behind. Perhaps you had a good reason for what you did here with composition?
TFS
Richard

Nice capture, but the space behind the bird to me is disturbing the show and composition.Also thanks for the note.

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