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Brown-headed Cowbird


Brown-headed Cowbird
Photo Information
Copyright: Jean Yves Bissonnette (JYB) Silver Note Writer [C: 2 W: 0 N: 84] (916)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-04-19
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon 30D, Canon 100-400L 4.5-5.6 IS USM
Exposure: f/8, 1/250 seconds
Details: (Fill) Flash: Yes
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2008-04-21 5:00
Viewed: 3219
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Have a nice day to all. JYB

Description :

The Brown-headed Cowbird is the only brood parasite common across North America. A female cowbird makes no nest of her own, but instead lays her eggs in the nests of other bird species, who then raise the young cowbirds.

Medium-sized songbird.
Medium-long tail.
Bill stout and pointed.
Male shiny black with brown head and neck.
Female dull gray-brown.

Size: 17-22 cm (7-9 in)
Wingspan: 28-36 cm (11-14 in)
Weight: 38-50 g (1.34-1.77 ounces)
Sex Differences
Male shiny black with brown head and neck, female plain gray-brown.

Sound
Song a pair of low "glug, glug" notes followed by slurred whistles ending on a very high pitch. Calls include a chatter and a whistled "fee-bee."

Status

Originally a bison-following bird of the Great Plains, the Brown-headed Cowbird spread eastward in the 1800s as forests were cleared. It is a common bird across most of North America, but numbers are declining in most areas. Its habit of nest parasitism can cause the decline of species with small populations, such as Kirtland's Warbler and Black-capped Vireo. You can help scientists learn more about this species by participating in the Celebrate Urban Birds! project.

Other Names
Vacher à tête brune (French)
Tordo negro (Spanish)


Cool Facts

The Brown-headed Cowbird is the only brood parasite common across North America. A female cowbird makes no nest of her own, but instead lays her eggs in the nests of other bird species, who then raise the young cowbirds.
The Brown-headed Cowbird lays eggs in the nests of many different species of birds. Recent genetic analyses have shown that some female cowbirds will use a number of different hosts, but most females specialize on one particular host species.
Social relationships are difficult to figure out in birds that do not build nests, but male and female Brown-headed Cowbirds are not monogamous. Genetic analyses show that males and females have several different mates within a single season.

Source : http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Brown-headed_Cowbird.html


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Critiques [Translate]

Bonjour Jean Yves,
C'est un portrait très original de cet oiseau que je ne connais pas. J'aime bien l'effet ton sur ton et la belle luminosité! La composition est excellente, bravo!
Claudine

Hello Jean Yves,
Excellent portrait of the cowbird and well exposed with natural light and flash. It's not often that we see a bird this close.
Regards,
Greg

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