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Dark Eyed Junco


Dark Eyed Junco
Photo Information
Copyright: angela LL (angela926) Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 470 W: 19 N: 798] (3083)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2008-11-10
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon EOS 40 D, EF 75-300 mm f/4-5.6 III
Exposure: f/7.1, 1/400 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2008-11-10 19:25
Viewed: 2837
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Dark Eyed Junco Taken at Gedney Park in New Castle New York.

A widespread and common small sparrow, the Dark-eyed Junco is most familiar as a winter visitor to bird feeders. It comes in several distinctly different looking forms, but all are readily identified as "juncos" by their plain patterning, dark hood, and white outer tail feathers.

Description

Medium-sized sparrow.
Unstreaked gray or brown, no wingbars (usually).
Gray to black hood.
Belly white.
White outer tail feathers.
Eyes dark. Legs pink.

Size: 14-16 cm (6-6 in)
Wingspan: 18-25 cm (7-10 in)
Weight: 18-30 g (0.64-1.06 ounces)
Sex Differences
Sexes similar, but females average paler and browner.

Sound
Song is a musical trill. Calls a hard "tick," "smack," and a short twittering trill
Cool Facts


Juncos are the "snowbirds" of the middle latitudes. In the eastern United States, they appear in all but the most northern states only in the winter, and then retreat each spring. Some juncos in the Appalachian Mountains remain there all year round, breeding at the higher elevations. These residents have shorter wings than the migrants that join them each winter. Longer wings help the migrants fly long distances.


The Dark-eyed Junco includes five forms that were once considered separate species. The "slate-colored junco" is the grayest, found from Alaska to Texas and eastward. The "Oregon junco" is boldly marked blackish and brown, with a distinct dark hood, and is found in the western half of the continent. The "gray-headed junco" has a brown back and gray sides and lives in the central Rocky Mountains. The "white-winged junco" is all gray with white wingbars, and breeds only near the Black Hills of South Dakota. The "Guadalupe junco" of Baja California is dull and brownish. Two other forms may be distinguishable: the "pink-sided junco," a pale version of the Oregon junco, living in the northern Rocky Mountains, and the "red-backed junco," a gray-headed junco with a dark upper bill, found in mountains near the Mexican border.


The Dark-eyed Junco is a common bird at winter bird feeders across North America. Data from Project FeederWatch show that it is often the most common feeder bird in an area, and it is on the top-ten lists of all regions except the Southeast and South-Central (where it is 11th and 12th, respectively).

Adanac, CeltickRanger, Dis. Ac. has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • Adanac Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 1273 W: 1 N: 6188] (21378)
  • [2008-11-10 19:42]

Hello Angela,
Splendid composition with a wonderful species and scene very well captured. I like this species a great deal we have pink-sided here, thanks for sharing Angela.
Rick

hello Angela

beautiful composition of this beautiful bird,
last year with my bridge style camera on a bad light
i tried to do shots of a Dark Eyed Junco and i did'nt had succes,
you did a nice job, with fine POV and framing,
i love to see with the bird his environment, TFS

Asbed

Hello Angela,

Good composition of this beautiful bird in his natural habitat.
Difficult bird trough his colors to photograph.

Gert

  • Great 
  • EOSF1 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1393 W: 119 N: 5267] (23955)
  • [2008-11-15 9:10]

Hello Angela, a fine composition with very subtle colors, well done my friend!

Mario

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