<< Previous Next >>

Tui In Evening Light


Tui In Evening Light
Photo Information
Copyright: Pam Russell (coasties) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3749 W: 483 N: 8155] (28054)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-10-30
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mark III, Canon EF 100-400mm L IS USM, Digital RAW 400, Hoya UV 77mm
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): Birds of New Zealand [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2007-10-30 1:51
Viewed: 4858
Points: 10
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
This is one of my first images taken with my new camera. I can see that I have some work ahead of me with getting the settings to my liking, but with saying that, I like this shot of the New Zealand Tui in the setting sun. Thanks for looking.

Tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae)

The tui is a member of the honeyeater family, and as such has a curved bill and a long tongue, frayed at the end like a brush, which is used to reach deeply into flowers and drink nectar. Like the other two New Zealand honeyeaters, the Bellbird and the Stitchbird, they feed on a mixture of nectar, fruit, and insects. They are the dominant honeyeater in New Zealand, being aggressive and pugnacious, which accounts for their successful survival on the mainland throughout NZ. They vigorously chase other Tui and other species from their feeding and breeding territories which they strongly defend. They are often seen diving vertically at great speed whilst chasing birds.

The Tui is a dark coloured bird, almost black at first glance but is in fact an iridescent green with a reddish brown back. It has two white throat tuffs forming a bib under it's chin. The neck has a lacy white collar of very fine white feathers.

The Tui has a very noisy whirring flight which is very fast, swooping and undulating. It has a variety of calls, consisting of rich, fluid, melodious notes intermixed with croaks, coughs, clicks, grunts, wheezes, squeaks, and chuckles. They have been heard to mimic other species.

Tuis have always existed on Tiritiri Matangi and the population continues to grow every year. Many of them form loose flocks in the winter and fly to winter feeding sites, sometimes as far as 20 kms away, returning in the summer.

Vital Statistics

Conservation Status: Protected Endemic
Mainland Status: Common throughout NZ
Size: 30cm, 120g (males), 90g (females)
Life Span: Oldest recorded 12+ Years
Breeding: September - January
Diet: Mainly nectar and fruit, some invertebrates

The above obtained from http://www.tiritirimatangi.org.nz/Fauna/Tui.htm

IMAGE INFORMATION

Camera: Canon 1D Mk lll
Time of day: 19:33 p.m.
Date: 30th October 2007
Weather conditions: Dusk
Lens: Canon 100-400mm L IS USM
Filter: Hoya 77mm UV
Shutter Speed: 1/400
F-Stop: F/5.6
Focal Length: 400mm
Support: Hand Held
ISO: 400

Kathleen, kjpweb, marhowie, peter_stoeckl has marked this note useful
Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

Lovely shot of this Tui Pam.
A shame the light didn't allow for a little more detail but it still looks beautiful anyway.
I guess you were too far away for a fill flash,and you probably wanted to use that nice natural glow.
A beautiful composition.
Cheers
Steve

Hi Pam.
It is a lovely light coming in, would have been the best if he had turned around into the golden glow as the light has picked up detail on his back.
Well done for trying it out,

Kathleen

Hi Pam
It's a shame the Tui wouldn't turn on command!!
I like this shot even if it doesn't show the great colours - it shows the plummage on under the neck and on the back of the neck like I have never seen it,
Well done!
You have the latest of the new toys - I would love to hear feedback on your camera.
Cheers
Neroli

Congrats on the new "weapon"! Well it is a tad dark, but on the other hand it is interesting as is. Well done! Cheers, Klaus

Don't be afraid to jack up that film speed Pam, ISO 400 should be a thing of the past :)
Howard

Hello Pam,
very precise and nicely composed attractively lighted capture. I like that friendly looking Tui and its silhouette against the clear blue sky with that funny pair of feathers on its neck. Thank you! My best regards,
Peter

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF