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Sea Anemone


Sea Anemone
Photo Information
Copyright: Ricardo Kuehn (ryyck) Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 24 W: 0 N: 176] (994)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2005
Categories: Fish
Camera: Canon A60
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): Underwater Wonder World 2 [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2005-10-19 12:41
Viewed: 6779
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Cnidaria
Class: Anthozoa
Subclass: Hexacorallia
Order: Actiniaria

Named after a terrestrial flower, the anemone, the sea anemone is a group of water-dwelling, filter feeding animals of the order Actinaria. As a cnidarian, it is closely related to coral and jellyfish. The anemone is a (usually) solitary polyp with stinging cells (cnidocytes) in its tentacles. These stinging cells serve to paralyze and capture prey, which is then moved by the tentacles to the mouth for digestion inside a central cavity.

Other close relations to the sea anemone are the solitary, tube-dwelling anemones and the hydras.

The sea anemone has a foot which in most species attaches itself to rocks or anchors in the sand. Some species attach to kelp and others are free-swimming. Although not plants and therefore incapable of photosynthesis themselves, many sea anemones form an important symbiosis with certain single-celled green algae species which reside in the animals' gastrodermal cells. These algae may be either zooxanthellae, zoochlorellae or both. The sea anemone benefits from the products of the algae's photosynthesis, namely oxygen and food in the form of glycerol, glucose and alanine; the algae in turn are assured a reliable exposure to sunlight, which the anemones actively maintain. The preponderance of species inhabit tropical reefs, although there are species adapted to relatively cold waters, intertidal reefs, and sand/kelp environments.

Some sea anemones form symbiotic relationships with crabs and anemone fish, also known as clownfish. In the former situation, anemones will either attach or be attached to the shell of a hermit crab (by the crab's own volition), providing additional protection for the crab and allowing the anemone to eat scraps when the crab feeds. A similar relationship can be formed between a sea anemone and a clownfish. The clownfish presses itself into the anemone, living comfortably within the stinging tentacles: This is possible because of a protective mucus that covers the clownfish. The clownfish benefits from this symbiotic relationship because it is protected by the anemone. The anemone benefits because the anemone gets food scraps from the clownfish.

Source: http://www.answers.com/sea%20anemone

wishnugaruda, TAZ has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Ricardo,
what a wonderful plant, the colours are so beautiful and sharpness is excellent.
I like it and also your informative note, thank you very much - greetings
Sabine - wishnugaruda

  • Great 
  • Athila Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 335 W: 239 N: 493] (1982)
  • [2005-10-19 21:54]

Nice picture of Anemone!
I like the square format, color, exposure and contrast are good. Just a correction for Sabine - Wishnugaruda... The anemone is not a plant but an animal. TFS

  • Great 
  • TAZ Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2241 W: 47 N: 3167] (10926)
  • [2005-10-20 3:34]

What a beautiful and interesting shot that you have well done. I have never see this... Congratulations Ricardo and thanks for sharing.

Hi Ricardo,
It's a beautiful animal you have caught. Lovely colours, good details and POV.
Well done.

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