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atelopus_spumarius


atelopus_spumarius
Photo Information
Copyright: Christian Oskamp (crissie78) Silver Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 19 W: 3 N: 70] (399)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2005-02-01
Categories: Amphibians
Exposure: f/6.3, 1/250 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version, Workshop
Theme(s): Rare Creatures [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2006-01-05 6:22
Viewed: 5011
Points: 4
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
I took this picture of this very elegant toad in Surinam, Brownsberg naturepark. It was very hard to get a right shot of this little guy because he was continious on the move. But I Think it's a great shot. Below some details about this little toad. There is no English name only a scientific: Atelopus spumarius

Males 26-29 mm, females 31-39 mm. The body is depressed; the head is narrow, and the snout is pointed. The tympanum is absent; the skin on the dorsum is finely spiculate, nearly smooth, like that on the venter. The digits are short with rounded tips. Usually the dorsum has irregular, longitudinal black marks separated by pale green areas in which small black spots are present. The venter is pale yellow with black markings. The palms, soles and proximal ventral surfaces of the thighs are bright orange. The iris is pale greenish-gold.

Ecology

Habitat:
tropical rain forest, found in terre firme forest usually near blackwater streams (at RCTT).

Niche:
carnivorous: prey includes insects and and any other small creatures it can catch.

Life History:
This frog is active by day on the ground in primary forest. When disturbed by a potential predator, the frog often arches its back while rocking on its belly with the bright orange palms and soles turned upward. The tadpoles attain a length of about 15 mm, of which about 1/2 is tail. The large mouth is ventral in the anterior part of a large suctorial disc, by means of which the tadpole adheres to objects in swiftly moving streams.

Status:
Uncommon, present in undisturbed forested areas.


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Critiques [Translate]

Like its cousin a.zeteki it also shares the same beauty in shape and form. You have a nice POV on this image. :)

What a beautiful frog, Chris. I don't think I have ever seen one with such colors and markings. Quite unusual. Great POV and pose. He looked like a frog with places to go. : )
I did a workshop to brighten the colors a bit. Hope you like it.

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