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Here's lookin' at ya!


Here's lookin' at ya!
Photo Information
Copyright: Jay Meeuwig (Shoot_Score) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 445 W: 302 N: 670] (2376)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2005-11-05
Categories: Ocean
Camera: Fuji FinePix 3800
Photo Version: Final Version, Original Version, Workshop
Date Submitted: 2007-06-10 16:12
Viewed: 1975
Points: 22
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
...
under the waterline
no place to retire
to another time
the eyes of the world now turn . . .

...

Beaches are special places... They are the interface between land and sea, and every so often there is some confusion. Here we have a jellyfish that should have been swimming in the sea now resting on a beached cuttlebone... It won't be long and the hot Australian sun will have dried out this creature.

I had the distinct feeling I was being looked at. And not with approval...
Such a sad face.

Jellyfish are marine invertebrates belonging to the Scyphozoan class. The body of an adult jellyfish is composed of a bell-shaped, jelly producing substance enclosing its internal structure, from which the creature's tentacles are suspended. Each tentacle is covered with stinging cells (cnidocytes) that can sting or kill other animals: most jellyfish use them to secure prey or as a defense mechanism. Others, such as Rhizostomae, do not have tentacles at all. Most jellies must compensate for a lack of basic sensory organs and a brain, the jellyfish exploits its nervous system and rhopalia to perceive stimuli, such as light or odor, and orchestrate expedient responses. In its adult form, it is composed of 94–98% water and can be found in every ocean in the world. Some jelly fish do have these body parts such as the box jelly fish. Most jellyfish are passive drifters that feed on small fish and zooplankton that become caught in their tentacles.

Since jellyfish do not biologically qualify as actual "fish", the term "jellyfish" is considered a misnomer by some, who instead employ the names "jellies" or "sea jellies". The name "jellyfish" is also often used to denote either Hydrozoa or the box jellyfish, Cubozoa. The class name Scyphozoa comes from the Greek word skyphos, denoting a kind of drinking cup and alluding to the cup shape of the organism.

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loot, PaulH, bobair, marhowie, LordPotty, JPlumb, mlines, pvs has marked this note useful
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Discussions
ThreadThread Starter Messages Updated
To hookery: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 01:00
To furkanselamet: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:59
To gannu: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:58
To pvs: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:57
To mlines: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:56
To JPlumb: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:56
To JoseMiguel: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:55
To marhowie: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:54
To bobair: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:54
To PaulH: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:52
To loot: Update: Blue ButtonShoot_Score 1 06-12 00:52
To JPlumb: if maybe it was a polyp (stage)Shoot_Score 1 06-10 22:18
To PaulH: i wasn't sure what i was looking atShoot_Score 1 06-10 19:12
To bobair: such a thing as it is so alien to me, ...Shoot_Score 1 06-10 18:41
To loot: sometimes even a little weird, ...Shoot_Score 3 06-10 18:38
To loot: sometimes even a little weird, ...Shoot_Score 1 06-10 16:40
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • loot Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5524 W: 722 N: 4163] (11276)
  • [2007-06-10 16:28]
  • [3] [+]

Hi Jay

This jelly did not look where it was going possibly because it had "blueberry pie in the eye" or otherwise it was a serious case of mistaken identity. It looks like it clung to that cuttlebone for dear life.

Well spotted and captured and with an attention-grabbing note to go with it. But that (I have learned) is normally the case with most of your postings. Informative, interesting, funny, or sometimes even a little weird, but always fascinating. Great colours, details, and exposure with a good composition.

Good work MF and TFS.
Regards
Loot

  • Great 
  • PaulH Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1137 W: 26 N: 3879] (13882)
  • [2007-06-10 16:57]
  • [+]

Hi Jay,
intriguing shot, i wasn't sure what i was looking at until i read your note! The details you've caught are great, very well spotted.
tfs,
Paul

Hello Jay,
this photo you have up-loaded is something I have never before seen yet let imagined could even exist.I don't even know how to critique such a thing as it is so alien to me,but for what it is worth you did one heck of a job in your capture of this critter and thank you for sharing it with us all. Bob

Cool Jay, Almost looks like a one-eyed sea monster! You have an "eye" for the shot ;}}
Well seen, well taken.
Howard

Hi Jay,
A very impressive capture!
It reminds me some of the psicodelia of the 60's...
So curious the round form and the parts that leaves from it, nice blue colour and dotted silouettes.
The close approach worked great to show us this magnificent detail.
Congratulations and thanks for share it.
My best regards,
JM

Hi Jay, great shot of this Jelly. Almost looks like a cyclops looking at you. I've never seen one like this, did some surfing to see if I could identify it, and couldn't (yet). I'm wondering if maybe it was a polyp (stage) and still attached to the cuttlebone. You didn't try to scrape it off did you? I'm guessing it was a recent wash up as it's still maintaining its deep blue colour. Very nice find on your part.

Thanks, John

Hi Jay. Most interesting observation of this strange combination of life and death. Good notes and presentation. TFS. Murray.

  • Great 
  • pvs Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1127 W: 254 N: 3161] (14464)
  • [2007-06-11 1:40]
  • [+]

Hi Jay,

A different,but well captured picture,well done and tfs this different shot and note,

tfs
Paul

  • Great 
  • gannu Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 988 W: 4 N: 3277] (14761)
  • [2007-06-11 4:22]
  • [+]

Jay, Real nice shot and lovely notes. Good details and nice exposure. TFS Ganesh

hi Jay
very interesting and differnt picture.
furkan selamet.

Una foto muy interezante, esta en realidad no es una verdadera meduza (Scyphozoa) sino un hidrozoo llamado Porpita porpita, pueden ver un poco más en:

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/cnidaria/chondrophorina.html

http://www.imagequest3d.com/catalogue/jellyfish/index1.htm

Saludos

Yuri

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