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Tephritis bardanea


Tephritis bardanea
Photo Information
Copyright: Nicolas Moulin (nimou) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 148 W: 1 N: 687] (3171)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-08
Categories: Insects
Camera: Kodak DX6490, Raynox DCR250
Details: (Fill) Flash: Yes
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): Dipterans (except Hover flies) of Europe-1 [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2007-08-28 9:26
Viewed: 3320
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Camara Kodak DX6490 con Raynox DCR 250
Campo de Tarragona - Reus

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Suborder: Brachycera
Section: Schizophora
Subsection: Acalyptratae
Superfamily: Tephritoidea
Family: Tephritidae

Tephritidae is one of two fly families referred to as "fruit flies." Tephritidae does not include the biological model organisms of the genus Drosophila, which is often called the "common fruit fly". Drosophila is, instead, the type genus of the second "fruit fly" family, Drosophilidae. There are nearly 5,000 described species of tephritid fruit fly, categorized in almost 500 genera. Description, recategorization, and genetic analysis are constantly changing the taxonomy of the fruit fly family.

Tephritid fruit flies are of major importance in agriculture. Some have negative effects, some positive. Various species of fruit fly cause damage to fruit and other plant crops. The genus Bactrocera is of worldwide notoriety for its destructive impact on agriculture. The olive fruit fly (B. oleae), for example, feeds on only one plant: the wild or commercially cultivated olive. It has the capacity to ruin 100% of an olive crop by damaging the fruit. On the other hand, some fruit flies are used as agents of biological control, thereby reducing the populations of pest species. Several species of the fruit fly genus Urophora have been shown to be effective agents against rangeland-destroying noxious weeds such as starthistles and knapweeds.

Most fruit flies lay their eggs in plant tissues, where the larvae find their first food upon emerging. The adults usually have a very short lifespan. Some live for less than a week.

Fruit flies use an open circulatory system as their cardiovascular system.

Their behavioral ecology is of great interest to biologists. Some fruit flies have extensive mating rituals or territorial displays. Many are brightly colored and visually showy. Some fruit flies show Batesian mimicry, bearing the colors and markings of dangerous insects such as wasps because it helps the fruit flies to avoid predators; the flies, of course, lack stingers.

Extract from Wikipedia

Arjun, jrobertop, Alex99 has marked this note useful
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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • Arjun Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 358 W: 7 N: 1237] (7593)
  • [2007-08-28 10:01]

hi nicolas,
a good picture from you again.
nice details but i think the hind wings are a bit soft in focus.
tfs

Hello Nicolas
This is a very beautiful picture from you.Yes,I also agree with Arjun,thewings are a bit out-of-focus.But that does not matter.Anyway,a superb picture.TFS
Akshay

Hi Nicolas,
Excellent macro!
Register rich in details.
Nice colors, contrast and sharpness.
Well done!
Best regards,
Josť Roberto

  • Great 
  • Alex99 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 4072 W: 133 N: 7096] (23735)
  • [2007-08-30 10:47]

Hi Nicolas.
You managed to find and picture so beautiful fly. Your POV is great. Subject is simple and very impressive. Eyes of the fly, reproduction of its hair are superb. Bravo and TFS.
Alexei.

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