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Common Blue Damselfly


Common Blue Damselfly
Photo Information
Copyright: Hans Hendriks (hansh) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 277 W: 1 N: 741] (2762)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2009-05-17
Categories: Insects
Camera: Canon 20D, Sigma 150mm f2.8 macro
Exposure: f/4, 1/160 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Theme(s): Damselflys [view contributor(s)]
Date Submitted: 2009-10-20 11:25
Viewed: 2747
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Common Blue Damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) is a European damselfly.

The species can reach a length of 32 to 35 mm. It is common in all of Europe, except for Iceland.

Identification:
The Common Blue Damselfly can be easily mistaken for the Azure Damselfly (Coenagrion puella), but on the back and the thorax, the Common Blue Damselfly has more blue than black; for the Azure Damselfly it is the other way around.

Another difference can be observed when inspecting the side of the thorax. The Common Blue Damselfly has only one small black stripe there, while all other blue damselflies have two.

During mating, the male clasps the female by her neck while she bends her body around to his reproductive organs this is called a mating wheel. The pair flies together over the water and eggs are laid within a suitable plant, just below the surface.

The eggs hatch and the larvae, called nymphs, live in the water and feed on small aquatic animals. Nymphs climb out of the water up a suitable stem to moult into damselflies.

Behaviour:
This small, brightly coloured damselfly is probably the most common of dragonflies and damselflies throughout much of Britain. It inhabits a wide range of habitats, from small ponds to rivers. They are especially common at lakes and reservoirs.

This damselfly requires a close look for a beginner to distinguish them from an Azure Damselfly. Typically, they fly low through the reeds and often fly well out over the water, unlike Azure Damselflies. They are also a brighter blue than Azures. They can be easy to get close to, but to tell them apart from an Azure Damselfly it is good to know what to look for.

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Critiques [Translate]

Hans,
Wonderful sharp details!
Lovely colors too!
Great POV,BG!
Mariana

  • Great 
  • roges Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 957 W: 0 N: 1329] (6264)
  • [2009-10-20 12:10]

Hi Hans,

Opnieuw een schitterende macro! Prachtige kleuren, warm en helder. Fantastic details.
Een mooie avond,
Adrian

hallo Hans
bedankt
dit is weer een plaatje!!
zo mooi scherp met goede details en een super compositie
goedeBG.
groetjes lou

perfect shot with optimum bokeh for this nice damsel
really well done
greetings
Matteo

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