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Broad-bodied Chaser


Broad-bodied Chaser
Photo Information
Copyright: Euthymios Iv (euthiv) Silver Note Writer [C: 0 W: 0 N: 81] (470)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2010-06-18
Categories: Insects
Camera: Nikon DSLR D70, AF-S Micro NIKKOR 60mm 1:2.8G ED
Exposure: f/14.0, 1/100 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2010-07-04 3:07
Viewed: 3013
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Libellula depressa

"Scientific classification

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Arthropoda

Class: Insecta

Order: Odonata

Suborder: Anisoptera

Family: Libellulidae

Genus: Libellula

Species: L. depressa

Binomial name

Libellula depressa
(Linnaeus, 1758)

The Broad-bodied Chaser, Libellula depressa, is a European dragonfly. The approximate wing-span of the broad-bodied chaser is 70 millimeters. It occurs in Europe except for the northern parts and in Asia eastwards to south-west Siberia. In Great Britain, it is mainly found in Wales and Southern England, active between the months of May and August.
Habitat
It is seen near still-water lakes and ponds, feeding on many types of small insects.
Identification
The female has a brown abdomen with two yellow stripes. The male has a pale blue abdomen. Because of the male's pale blue abdomen, they can be confused with the Black-tailed Skimmer, or Orthetrum cancellatum. Both the male and female broad-bodied chasers have dark brown, triangular patches at the base of all four wings.
Behaviour
Their flight is very fast as they dart and dive above the water looking for food and fighting away rival males and any other dragonflies they happen to encounter. They characteristically return to a favoured perch, in the sun. They can be hard to get close views of but if seen near some woodland they may allow you to observe them.

Scarce Swallowtail
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Scientific classification

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Arthropoda

Class: Insecta

Order: Lepidoptera

Suborder: Ditrysia

Family: Papilionidae

Subfamily: Papilioninae

Genus: Iphiclides

Species: I. podalirius
Binomial name

Iphiclides podalirius
Linnaeus, 1758

The Scarce Swallowtail (Iphiclides podalirius) is a butterfly found in gardens, fields and open woodlands. It is found in places with sloe thickets and particularly orchards. It is also called Sail Swallowtail or Pear-tree Swallowtail.
Distribution
It is widespread throughout Europe with the exception of the northern parts. Its range extends northwards to Saxony and central Poland and eastwards across Asia Minor and Transcaucasia as far as the Arabian peninsula, India, and western China. A few specimens of the Scarce Swallowtail have been reported from central Sweden and the UK but they were probably only strays and not migrants. The scarcity of UK migrants is responsible for the English common name. In the Alps it can be found up to altitudes of 1600 m.
Status
In some years the Scarce Swallowtail is quite abundant. The Scarce Swallowtail is getting rarer as the blackthorn bushes are being cleared; and it is now protected in some central European countries. It is protected by law in Czech republic, Slovakia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg and Poland. It is considered Rare-Endangered and protected in some provinces of Austria and of status Indeterminate throughout Europe.
Life cycle
The food plant includes hawthorn bushes. The caterpillars spin little pads on leaves and grip them firmly. The newly hatched caterpillar is dark in colour with two smaller and two bigger greenish patches on the dorsal side, later they are greenish with yellowish dorsal and side stripes. The summer chrysalids are green as a rule, the hibernating ones are brown. A number of hibernating chrysalids fall prey to various enemies."
(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


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Critiques [Translate]

hi Euthymios, fantastic macro, thanks for showing
kind regards
chris

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