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Crucibulum laeve


Crucibulum laeve
Photo Information
Copyright: Volkan Eroglu (Gramineae) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 62 W: 3 N: 212] (1074)
Genre: Fungi
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2011-06-14
Categories: Fungi
Camera: Nikon D-5000, 18-55mm AF-S Nikkor
Exposure: f/8, 1/80 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2011-07-11 23:53
Viewed: 3250
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
NIDULARIACEAE

Crucibulum laeve

Crucibulum is a genus in the Nidulariaceae, a family of fungi whose fruiting bodies resemble tiny egg-filled bird's nests. Often called "splash cups", the fruiting bodies are adapted for spore dispersal by using the kinetic energy of falling drops of rain. The "eggs" inside the bird's nests (technically known as peridioles) are hard waxy shells containing spores, and tend to stick to whatever nearby herbage they land on, thus increasing the odds of being consumed and dispersed by herbivorous animals. Members of this genus are saprobic, obtaining nutrients from dead organic matter, and are typically found growing on decayed wood and wood debris. The three known Crucibulum species (C. laeve, C. parvulum, and C. cyathiforme) are distinguished from other genera of the Nidulariaceae by their relatively simple funiculus a cord of hyphae that connects the peridiole (the "eggs") to the exterior of the bird's nest.


LIFE CYCLE

The life cycle of Crucibulum, which contains both haploid and diploid stages, is typical of the species of Basidiomycota that can reproduce both asexually (via vegetative spores), or sexually (with meiosis). Like other wood-decay fungi, this life cycle may be considered as two functionally different phases: the vegetative stage for the spread of mycelia, and the reproductive stage for the establishment of spore-producing structures, the fruiting bodies.

The vegetative stage encompasses those phases of the life cycle involved with the germination, spread, and survival of the mycelium. Spores germinate under suitable conditions of moisture and temperature, and grow into branching filaments called hyphae, pushing out like roots into the rotting wood. These hyphae are homokaryotic, containing a single nucleus in each compartment; they increase in length by adding cell-wall material to a growing tip. As these tips expand and spread to produce new growing points, a network called the mycelium develops. Mycelial growth occurs by mitosis and the synthesis of hyphal biomass. When two homokaryotic hyphae of different mating compatibility groups fuse with one another, they form a dikaryotic mycelia in a process called plasmogamy. Prerequisites for mycelial survival and colonization a substrate (like rotting wood) include suitable humidity and nutrient availability.Crucibulum laeve is saprobic, so mycelial growth in rotting wood is made possible by the secretion of enzymes that break down complex polysaccharides (such as cellulose and lignin) into simple sugars that can be used as nutrients.

After a period of time and under the appropriate environmental conditions, the dikaryotic mycelia may enter the reproductive stage of the life cycle. Fruiting body formation is influenced by external factors such as season (which affects temperature and air humidity), nutrients and light. As fruiting bodies develop they produce peridioles containing the basidia upon which new basidiospores are made. Young basidia contain a pair of haploid sexually compatible nuclei which fuse, and the resulting diploid fusion nucleus undergoes meiosis to produce basidiospores, each containing a single haploid nucleus. The dikaryotic mycelia from which the fruiting bodies are produced is long lasting, and will continue to produce successive generations of fruiting bodies as long as the environmental conditions are favorable

REFERENCE:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crucibulum_laeve

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Critiques [Translate]

really a rare photograph of the species. nicely taken with all perfection. good clarity. thanks for sharing.

Very interesting subject, nicely photographed. regards yiannis

hello Volkan
very nice picture with good details
thanks greeting lou

  • Great 
  • foozi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 2791 W: 0 N: 6696] (25839)
  • [2011-07-13 6:52]

Merhaba Volkan,
such an interesting fungi well shot and excellently presented in an artistic style. The beauty is well shown along with the details and features intact.
Excellent presentation of this special fungi.

Regards,
Foozi

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