<< Previous Next >>

Honey Buzzard


Honey Buzzard
Photo Information
Copyright: Zahoor Ahmed (zahoor_salmi) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 108 W: 0 N: 618] (5538)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2012-03-06
Categories: Birds
Camera: Canon 40D, 400f5.6 L
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/800 seconds
Details: Tripod: Yes
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2012-03-08 7:41
Viewed: 2146
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The European Honey Buzzard (Pernis apivorus), is a bird of prey in the family Accipitridae which also includes many other diurnal raptors such as kites, eagles and harriers.

Despite its name, this species is more closely related to kites of the genera Leptodon and Chondrohierax than to true buzzards in the genus Buteo.

It is a summer migrant to most of Europe and western Asia, wintering in tropical Africa. It is a specialist feeder, living mainly on the larvae and nests of wasps and hornets, although it will take small mammals, reptiles and birds. It is the only known predator of the Asian giant hornet. It is thought that Honey Buzzards have a chemical deterrent in their feathers that protects them from wasp attack. The specific name apivorus means "bee-eater", although bees are much less important than wasps in its diet.

The European Honey Buzzard breeds in woodland, and is inconspicuous except in the spring, when the mating display includes wing-clapping. Breeding males are fiercely territorial.

The 5260-centimetre-long (2024 in) Honey Buzzard is larger and longer winged, with a 135150-centimetre (5359 in) wingspan, when compared to the smaller Common Buzzard Buteo buteo. It appears longer necked with a small head, and soars on flat wings. It has a longer tail, which has fewer bars than the Buteo buzzard, usually with two narrow dark bars and a broad dark sub-terminal bar.

The sexes can be distinguished on plumage, which is unusual for a large bird of prey. The male has a blue-grey head, while the female's head is brown. The female is slightly larger and darker than the male.

drchoneydew has marked this note useful
Only registered TrekNature members may rate photo notes.
Add Critique [Critiquing Guidelines] 
Only registered TrekNature members may write critiques.
Discussions
None
You must be logged in to start a discussion.

Critiques [Translate]

Great Capture!!!!!!!! looks like one of our hawks!

Calibration Check
















0123456789ABCDEF