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Caspian Tern


Caspian Tern
Photo Information
Copyright: Zeno Swijtink (Zeno) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 483 W: 0 N: 1345] (10867)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2014-02-27
Categories: Birds
Camera: Nikon D7100, Nikon 300mm VR 2.8 D + TC 2X
Exposure: f/6.3, 1/800 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2014-03-24 11:18
Viewed: 2346
Points: 10
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia, formerly Sterna caspia)is a species of tern, with a subcosmopolitan but scattered distribution. Despite its extensive range, it is monotypic of its genus, and has no subspecies accepted either. In New Zealand it is also known by the Maori name Taranui.

It is the world's largest tern with a length of 48–60 cm (19–24 in), a wingspan of 127–145 cm (50–57 in) and a weight of 530–782 g (18.7–27.6 oz).
Adult birds have black legs, and a long thick red-orange bill with a small black tip. They have a white head with a black cap and white neck, belly and tail. The upper wings and back are pale grey; the underwings are pale with dark primary feathers. In flight, the tail is less forked than other terns and wing tips black on the underside.In winter, the black cap is still present (unlike many other terns), but with some white streaking on the forehead.
Their breeding habitat is large lakes and ocean coasts in North America (including the Great Lakes), and locally in Europe (mainly around the Baltic Sea and Black Sea), Asia, Africa, and Australasia (Australia and New Zealand). North American birds migrate to southern coasts, the West Indies and northernmost South America. European and Asian birds spend the non-breeding season in the Old World tropics. African and Australasian birds are resident or disperse over short distances.
The global population is about 50,000 pairs; numbers in most regions are stable, but the Baltic Sea population (1400–1475 pairs in the early 1990s) is declining and of conservation concern.
The Caspian Tern is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.
They feed mainly on fish, which they dive for, hovering high over the water and then plunging. They also occasionally eat large insects, the young and eggs of other birds and rodents. They may fly up to 60 km (37 mi) from the breeding colony to catch fish; it often fishes on freshwater lakes as well as at sea.
Breeding is in spring and summer, with one to three pale blue green eggs, with heavy brown spotting, being laid. They nest either together in colonies, or singly in mixed colonies of other tern and gull species. The nest is on the ground among gravel and sand, or sometimes on vegetation; incubation lasts for 26–28 days. The chicks are variable in plumage pattern, from pale creamy to darker grey-brown; this variation assists adults in recognizing their own chicks when returning to the colony from feeding trips. Fledging occurs after 35–45 days.

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Critiques [Translate]

Hello Zeno,
Like NOTE.
I like its plumage.Beautiful colour.Well captured.Good sharpness and POV.
Thanks for shAring,
Regards and have a nice time,
Srikumar

hallo Zeno
super scherpe opnam met goed licht en prachtige kleuren
Super mooie kop
groet lou

Bonsoir Zeno,
De superbes nuances de couleurs et une remarquable finesse des détails.
A bientôt sur TN pour de nouvelles aventures.
Gérard

  • Great 
  • lousat Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 6480 W: 89 N: 15613] (65313)
  • [2014-03-24 16:01]

Hi Zeno,a top quality in this difficult close up,fantastic details in the best exposure and a vert bright orange beak too.Have a nice day and thanks,Luciano

Beautiful capture with great detail of plumage and head. Grace for letting me know this species, mate. Congratulations!

Hernán Bortondello
ARGENTINA

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