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Common Sandpiper


Common Sandpiper
Photo Information
Copyright: Peter van Zoest (PeterZ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5137 W: 166 N: 13121] (49139)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2016-05-09
Categories: Birds
Camera: Nikon D90, Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD, Digital RAW
Exposure: f/6.3, 1/500 seconds
Details: Tripod: Yes
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2016-11-12 7:57
Viewed: 1658
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) is a small Palearctic wader. This bird and its American sister species, the Spotted Sandpiper (A. macularia), make up the genus Actitis. They are parapatric and replace each other geographically; stray birds of either species may settle down with breeders of the other and hybridize. Hybridization has also been reported between the Common Sandpiper and the Green Sandpiper, a basal species of the closely related shank genus Tringa.

Description
The adult is 18-20 cm long with a 32-35 cm wingspan. It has greyish-brown upperparts, white underparts, short dark-yellowish legs and feet, and a bill with a pale base and dark tip. In winter plumage, they are duller and have more conspicuous barring on the wings, though this is still only visible at close range. Juveniles are more heavily barred above and have buff edges to the wing feathers.

This species is very similar to the slightly larger Spotted Sandpiper (A. macularia) in non-breeding plumage. But its darker legs and feet and the crisper wing pattern (visible in flight) tend to give it away, and of course they are only rarely found in the same location.

Ecology
It is a gregarious bird and is seen in large flocks, and has the distinctive stiff-winged flight, low over the water, of Actitis waders. The Common Sandpiper breeds across most of temperate and subtropical Europe and Asia, and migrates to Africa, southern Asia and Australia in winter. The eastern edge of its migration route passes by Palau in Micronesia, where hundreds of birds may gather for a stop-over. They depart the Palau region for their breeding quarters around the last week of April to the first week of May.

The Common Sandpiper forages by sight on the ground or in shallow water, picking up small food items such as insects, crustaceans and other invertebrates; it may even catch insects in flight.

It nests on the ground near freshwater. When threatened, the young may cling to their parent's body to be flown away to safety.

The Common Sandpiper is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.
It is widespread and common, and therefore classified as a Species of Least Concern by the IUCN but is a vulnerable species in some states of Australia.

Source: Wikipedia


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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Peter

Very sharp image of the sandpiper. Beautiful. Do you think a wider aperture could have taken care of the background? But I understand that in Tamron 150-500 with a focal length of 600 you do not have the option.
Bala

  • Great 
  • lousat Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 6595 W: 89 N: 15659] (65489)
  • [2016-11-12 12:20]

Hi Peter,perfect DOF to create a nice 3D effect on this blurred confused background,great shot,not easy! Have a nice Sunday and thanks,Luciano

  • Great 
  • tuslaw Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2754 W: 282 N: 4931] (19883)
  • [2016-11-12 14:31]

Hello Peter,
Great shot of this fine looking Common Sandpiper. The focus is very sharp displaying excellent detail. Wonderful color tones and just the right amount of exposure. I like its unique Markings and you made nice eye contact.
I found it interesting that at times the young cling to their parents body when frightened and are flown to safety.
Ron

Hi Peter,
this time in Greece, you are flying around the globe as bird. ;-)
Very nice shot of the Sandpiper, ots of details in the plumage, nicely exposed with good WB.
The bird is sharp, well seen of the blury bg.

Well done, old friend.

Regards.
Gert

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