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Spirit of Lelawala


Spirit of Lelawala
Photo Information
Copyright: JC Ramos (jramos) Silver Note Writer [C: 0 W: 0 N: 44] (168)
Genre: Landscapes
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2006-10-10
Categories: Mountain, River
Camera: Canon Powershot S40
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2007-02-11 20:56
Viewed: 6997
Points: 0
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The name "Niagara" is said to originate from an Iroquois word "Onguiaahra" meaning "The Strait." The region's original inhabitants were the Ongiara, an Iroquois tribe named the Neutrals by French settlers, who found them helpful in mediating disputes with other tribes.

Native American legend tells of Lelawala, a beautiful maid betrothed by her father to a brave she despised. Rather than marry, Lelawala chose to sacrifice herself to her true love He-No, the Thunder God, who dwelt in a cave behind the Horseshoe Falls. She paddled her canoe into the swift current of the Niagara River and was swept over the brink. He-No caught her as she plummeted, and together their spirits are said to live forever in the Thunder God's sanctuary behind the Falls.

Niagara Falls is a set of massive waterfalls located on the Niagara River in eastern North America, on the border between the United States and Canada. Niagara Falls (French: les Chutes du Niagara) comprises three separate waterfalls: the Horseshoe Falls (Canadian Falls), the American Falls, and the smaller, adjacent Bridal Veil Falls. The Falls are located 16 miles (26 km) away from the U.S. city of Buffalo and 43 miles (69 km) from the Canadian city of Toronto. The distance to downtown Toronto is 80 miles (123 km) when using roads.

The Falls formed after the receding of the glaciers of the most recent Ice Age, as water from the newly formed Great Lakes carved a path through the Niagara Escarpment enroute to the Atlantic Ocean. While not exceptionally high, Niagara Falls is very wide. With more than 6 million cubic feet (168,000 m) of water falling over the crestline every minute[1] in high flow, and almost 4 million cubic feet (110,000 m) on average, it is the most powerful waterfall in North America.[2]


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