To Silke: PineJanice::2007-09-22 20:28
Hi Silke,
I checked on the web and found this:
Captain Cook thought the pine would provide "Masts for the largest Ships" but it was found later to be unsuitable for masts. It proved a useful timber for other purposes however, and Lt. King exported pine to Port Jackson in October 1788. Young trees have an almost symmetrical form for the first 40 years or so.
Cook’s assessment was not correct, and the timber was unsuitable for ship-building or masts, as the island would then have been denuded of these majestic trees which contribute so much to the scenic beauty and economy of Norfolk Island.
It is almost impossible to be anywhere on the island without seeing a pine tree. They grow in small forest areas, in groups and in avenues. Sometimes a single specimen stands alone or as sentinel on a cliff top, outlined against the sky. When a resident reaches 100 years, an equivalent number of pine trees are planted to mark the occasion. (To date, no male has reached this milestone.)

There's still MANY trees left, and if one is cut down they have to replant another one.
Thanks for your visit
Best regards
Janice
Australia
Title: Windy Cliff on Norfolk IslandCanon EOS 30d
Windy Cliff on Norfolk Island (16)
Janice Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3277 W: 148 N: 6163] (18832)
[Only registered members may post.] [Flat View] [Translate]
ThreadUsername Date
To Silke: Pine Janice Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3277 W: 148 N: 6163] (18832)::2007-09-22 20:28
:Re: To Silke: Pine Silke Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 729 W: 98 N: 1707] (5458)::2007-09-23 04:24
::Re: To Silke: Pine Janice Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 3277 W: 148 N: 6163] (18832)::2007-09-23 14:18