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Photo Information
Copyright: Jannie Maritz (Jannie) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 244 W: 6 N: 264] (1227)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Black & White
Date Taken: 2009-02-03
Categories: Mammals
Camera: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5, Leica DC Vario-Elmarit 1:2.8-3.3 / 6-72
Exposure: f/4, 1/200 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-02-20 4:26
Viewed: 5063
Favorites: 1 [view]
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Zebra - Equus quagga

Zebras are African equids best known for their distinctive white and black stripes. Their stripes come in different patterns unique to each individual. They are generally social animals and can be seen in small harems to large herds. Zebras are generally 2.3 m (8ft) long, stand 1.25-1.5 m (4-5ft) at the shoulder, and weigh around 300 kg (660 lbs), although some can grow to more than 410 kg (900 lbs). In addition to their stripes, zebras have erect, mohawk-like manes. Unlike their closest relatives, horses and donkeys, zebras have never been truly domesticated.

There are three species of zebra: the Plains Zebra, Grevy's Zebra and the Mountain Zebra. The Plains zebra and the Mountain Zebra belong to the subgenus Hippotigris, but Grevy's zebra is the sole species of subgenus Dolichohippus. The latter resembles an ass while the former two are more horse-like. Nevertheless, DNA and molecular data show that zebras do indeed have monophyletic origins. All three belong to the genus Equus along with other equids. In certain regions of Kenya, Plains zebras and Grevy's zebras coexist.

The unique stripes and behaviors of zebras make these among the most familiar animals to people. They can be found in a variety of habitats, such as grasslands, savannas, woodlands, thorny scrublands, mountains and coastal hills. However, various anthropogenic factors have severely impacted zebra populations, in particular hunting for skins and habitat destruction. Grevy's zebra and the Mountain zebra are endangered. While Plains zebras are much more plentiful, one subspecies, the quagga, went extinct in the late nineteenth century.

Photo was taken at the Kragga Kamma Game Park in Port Elizabeth.

All crits welcome

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Critiques [Translate]

Hello Jannie! Wonderful zebras. Amazing scene. Good contrast. Very good sharpness. original capture and frame. Fantastic effect. Good luck!

Hi Janine,
Excellent texture creating a strong sense of hardness on the subjects.Nice sharp focus creating intense detail on the zebra.Well done on this great black and white shot. TFS.
erwin.....

  • Great 
  • apj (75)
  • [2009-02-20 8:56]

Hello Jannie,
yours balck&white photo is wonderful.
Congratulation
Piotr

  • Great 
  • pvs Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1127 W: 254 N: 3161] (14464)
  • [2009-02-27 4:03]

Hi Jannie,

A nice idea to do this one in Black and white,good sharpness and well composed capture,thanks

Paul

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