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Blacksmith Plover


Blacksmith Plover
Photo Information
Copyright: Jannie Maritz (Jannie) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 244 W: 6 N: 264] (1227)
Genre: Animals
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-10-15
Categories: Birds
Camera: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5, Leica DC Vario-Elmarit 1:2.8-3.3 / 6-72
Exposure: f/4, 1/400 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2009-02-18 8:11
Viewed: 4059
Points: 8
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
Blacksmith Lapwing - Vanellus armatus

The Blacksmith Lapwing or Blacksmith Plover occurs commonly from Kenya through central Tanzania to southern and southwestern Africa. The vernacular name derives from the repeated metallic 'tink, tink, tink' alarm call, which suggests a blacksmith's hammer striking an anvil.

Description
Blacksmith Lapwings are very boldly patterned in black, grey and white, possibly warning colours to predators. It is one of five lapwing species (two African, one Asian and two Neotropical) that share the characteristics of a carpal (wing) spur, red eye and a bold pied plumage. The bare parts are black. Females average larger and heavier but the sexes are generally alike.

Habitat and numbers
The Blacksmith Lapwing occurs in association with wetlands of all sizes. Even very small damp areas caused by a spilling water trough can attract them. In South Africa they are most numerous in the mesic grassland region, less so in higher-rainfall grasslands. Like the Crowned Lapwing, this species may leave Zambia and Zimbabwe in years of high rainfall and return in dry years. It avoids mountains of any type.

Blacksmith Lapwings expanded their range in the 20th century into areas where dams were built and where intensive farming was practiced. Consequently they are now numerous and established in the western Cape region of South Africa, where they were absent until the 1930s. In this region they have also entered estuarine mud flats in winter where they aggressively displace other waders.

Behaviour and food
The species reacts aggressively to other lapwings or African Jacanas that may enter its wetland habitat. It breeds in spring, but its choice of nesting site and timing may be opportunistic. The young separate gradually from their parents and do not return to natal areas afterwards. They feed on aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates.

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Critiques [Translate]

  • Great 
  • cako Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 485 W: 0 N: 772] (3395)
  • [2009-02-18 9:41]

Hi Jannie
very nice composition
very good sharp
well done.

  • Great 
  • nglen Gold Star Critiquer/Silver Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2883 W: 30 N: 9683] (36145)
  • [2009-02-18 10:52]

Hi Jannie.This is a bird i have never seen or heard of so thanks for posting . You were able to get very close to this one . You have taken it with sharp focusing and fine detail. The lare red eye stands out so well. well done TFs. with interesting notes too.
Nick..

hello Jannie
beautiful picture
great deatils
and good sharpness
greeting lou

Hi Jannie,

Uitstekende skerpte en detail op die foto en jy moes by hom gewees het. Beligting goed gehanteer om wel boetjie detail in die wit areas te kry. Ek sal graag daardie lens van naby wil sien. Laat weet as jy weer Kruger toe kom, ek is so elke derde naweek daar.

Groete

Robin

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