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Who needs a straw? (30)
extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)
NOTE: There is a WORKSHOP with a wider view of the plant, please if anyboby knows the ident, please tell me.

The insects are Nymphs of Palomena prasina, and as you see they are very practical obtaining food from this nice plant. The little fruits look like mini apples :)

You can see the different development stages of this common bug HERE.

Description
This common bug has a flattened, shield-shaped body, as the name suggests. It is bright green in colour with delicate flecks of black that look like small puncture marks. In November, the insects darken in colour and spend the winter hibernating with a dark-bronze colouration. Although the sexes are similar in appearance, females tend to be larger than males. Like all bugs (Hemiptera), the green shield bug has specialised sucking mouthparts, which in this species are used to feed on plant sap. This species belongs to a sub-order known as the ‘true bugs’ (Heteroptera) in which only the tips of the wings are membranous; the rest of the wing is hardened. When the bug is at rest, the wings are held flat over the body and the membranous parts of the wings overlap.

Found in a wide range of habitats but becomes confined to woodlands in northern parts of its range. Its hosts include bushes and shrubs, but hazel is one of its preferred species.

Adult green shield bugs emerge from hibernation in May and mate in June. As with most bugs, individuals mate ‘back to back’. The eggs are laid in hexagonal batches of around 28, and a single female will lay a number of batches so that the total number she lays will be around 100. All bugs have a type of insect development known as ‘hemimetabolous development’ in which there is no larval stage but a number of wingless nymphs instead which resemble the adult form. This species passes through five nymphal stages, moulting between each one. Each stage has a different colouration, and the final stage has short wings. The adult stage is reached in September, and they go into hibernation in November.

I found this info HERE.

ISO100 - F:16 - 1/160 sec. - Manual exposure - Flash - Handheld

Altered Image #1

extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)
A general view.
Edited by:extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)

A wider view, if you know the name of the plant, tell me.
Regards, Felipe.