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::Garden Spider:: (56)
Runnerduck Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 381 W: 57 N: 616] (1851)
Araneus diadematus


The female Araneus diadematus has a length of 6.5 to 20 mm, whereas the male is 5.5 to 13 mm. The general color ranges from a pale yellow brown to nearly black. The folium is not as distinct in some of the other Aranea species, and it includes a number of white or yellow spots. The largest of the spots are arranged longitudinally near the anterior end. Usually, there is a pair of white spots at right angles to the longitudinal ones, which gives the group the form of a cross. The cross arrangement of the spots is more apparent in the darker varieties, and are caused by guanine cells which shine through the transparent cuticle. The carapace has a median and marginal dark bands. There are four pairs of legs which fan out radially from the connecting carapace and sternum. Each leg has seven segments: a coxa and a trochanter, which are both short; a long femur and a knee like patella; a slender tibia and metatarsus; and finally a tarsus with three claws. The first pair of the front legs are relatively long and used as feelers for probing the environment. Sensory hairs densely cover the distal leg segments. The external sex organs of the male and female can be seen on the ventral view. Both the male and female's genital openings lie inside the epigastric furrow, except that the epigynum is situated in front of the female furrow. The male also contains a bulb of palp used for the storage of sperm


Araneus diadematus Integrates information by the central nervous system and in the visual system of salticids. A spider will adjust its long body axis to be perpendicular to the path of a moving object in order to view the object with the main eyes. Input from the secondary eyes causes the spider to turn without any visual feedback. However, when a moving object is viewed only by the secondary eyes, a spider will not always turn towards it.

This species rebuilds its web every day so that the capture of their prey is more certain. The amino acid composition of the spider silk is a highly unusual protein. Amino acids with short side-chains make up 50-60% of the total fibroin. Before building a new web the spider eats its old web, thus conserving the silk proteins of the spider web.

The web of Araneus diadematus usually has 25-30 radial threads forming regular angles of 12-15 degrees. Webs of young individuals often have many more radii than those of adults.
(animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu)



This one had made its home on my eucalyptus. When the spiderlings were first born they were all over my washing line! Luckily they have now moved to a more stable home. I have counted at least six on the eucalyptus as well as a female Micrommata Virescens.


I think the ‘face’ (?) could have been sharper, but I really like the whole image, especially the BG which is just our brown fence!

Altered Image #2

Runnerduck Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 381 W: 57 N: 616] (1851)
More focus on the eye.
Edited by:extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)

Hi Julia. I tryed to make your desires come true, and put some more focus on the eyes.

First I zomed the eyes and turned pixel by pixel into black or white, to kill greyscales or brown tones, which give the OOF effect. It is easy with the brush tool set to 1 pix.

Then I made a mask to the face and USM 0.2 500%. Maybe a bit to much, as my monitor is a bit soft, so forgive me if I oversharpened.

Hope you like!

Altered Image #1

Runnerduck Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 381 W: 57 N: 616] (1851)
ID
Edited by:Runnerduck Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 381 W: 57 N: 616] (1851)

Another angle posted for ID purposes .... not a sharp image, if it was it wouldn't be posted as a ws ;-)