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Lycogala epidendron (14)
extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)
Lycogala epidendron.

NOTE: There in a WORKSHOP , showing what happens if you cut one of these.

Hello. Here I post another photo of one of my fauvorite subjects, a slime mould. Quite a lot of time from last TN post about them. If you don't know what is this, here you have a little explanation. This is not a plant, not an animal, not even fungi, is belongs to Protista kindom... or not... naturalists are still discussing :)

In the forest, when taking fungi shots, we came across a group of little orange balls, growing on rotten wood. Looking for an id, we found it in one of our amateur field guides. It was included in a page at the end, dedicated to Myxomicetes. It was a Lycogala epidendron. When I searched for more information, I was really surprised with what I found. Some of the things I could see in the forest, were not plants, animals or fungi. I new about the 4th. natural kindom, Monera (bacterias and so on), but I did not know that Protista existed.

- "Members of this class are commonly referred to as slime moulds. These have thought to belong to both animal and fungi kingdoms at one time or another. It's now known that they are quite unrelated to animals and fungi and now are classified in the Kingdom Protista.

However slime moulds do exhibit characteristics of both fungi and animals. In the feeding stage, the slime moulds moves about as a mass of protoplasm (the plasmodium) feeding on bacteria, spores, and other organic matter much like an amoeba. When the food supply is exhausted or other unfavourable conditions occur, the plasmodium changes, taking on the appearance of a fungus." -

This explanation is included in Clive Shirley's web site. It is a pity he is not anymore in TN, he moved some time ago. At least we have his beautiful HiddenForest web page where you can find further information about slime moulds, and a lot of beautiful photos.

I have my own theme where I try to include all slime moulds that appeared in TN, you can have a look HERE, we already have a nice collectionof weird thigs :).

If you know of any other photos that might be included, please tell me.

Interesting info about the Natural kingdoms and Slime moulds:
* A nice description in Wikipedia.
* A great article from Dalhouie University HERE.

Main pic.: F18 - 3.2 sec. - Manual mode - ISO 100 - Tripod
Workshop: F16 - 3.2 sec. - Manual mode - ISO100 - Tripod

Altered Image #1

extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)
Cut one L.epidendrum
Edited by:extramundi Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1880 W: 338 N: 4268] (13178)

They are full of a "super orange" dense fluid, which will turn into spores soon.