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Ex-rare (46)
red45 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2636 W: 74 N: 9091] (31094)
This is probably six spot burnet moth or one of similiar kind. Last year I saw this moth for first time in my life about 200 km south from Lodz in Jura Krakowsko-Czestochowska mountains. I thought I was lucky because it seems to be rather rare insect. But this year I saw this kind of moth many times in The Garden. They're not very common but not rare for sure.

Latin name: Zygaena filipendulae

Size: Wingspan approximately 35mms.

Distribution: Found throughout England and the coasts of Wales and Scotland.

Months seen: June to August.

Habitat: Meadows, downland and heathland.

Food: Nectar.

Special features: Six-spot burnets are day flying moths. The six red spots on each of the moths greenish-black fore-wings are a warning to predators that this moth tastes bad! The caterpillars feed on trefoil and vetch which contain traces of the poison cyanide. These toxins are carried on through to the adult moth. The caterpillars pupate on grass stems, forming a yellow coloured chrysalis.

From Garden Safari website

Altered Image #1

red45 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2636 W: 74 N: 9091] (31094)
just turning
Edited by:carper Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1973 W: 119 N: 2582] (8439)

for the composition.
gr. Jaap