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An Orange fungi (32)
sandpiper2 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1906 W: 107 N: 4875] (16757)
This is a Beech Orange fungi (Cyttaria septentrionalis), a strange orange globular fungi that only grow on Antarctic Beech trees (Northofagus moorei). Antarctic Beech trees are an ancient species that only grow above 1,000m in cool moist environments where they form dense forests; some trees reputedly up to 2,000 years old.
This fungi is around 60mm in diameter and looks something like an over-sized golf ball. When the fruiting body first emerges it is covered with a pale pinkish membrane that peels off to reveal this amazing pitted structure. It has a very short stem and has an attractive faint apricot smell.
This one was found along the Five Day Creek track in New England National Park. Here, huge beech trees grow amongst the moss-covered understorey, a steep but very picturesque 5 hour walk.
We found two specimens of this unusual fungi growing on fallen limbs. I have posted another closer view of the second specimen in the workshop.
Thanks for looking.

Altered Image #2

sandpiper2 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1906 W: 107 N: 4875] (16757)
Adobe Photoshop CS2
Edited by:Hormon_Manyer Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1472 W: 308 N: 2610] (10251)

Cropping the little oof line of the foreground, adding a frame for being even more elegant (although it's personal).

Altered Image #1

sandpiper2 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1906 W: 107 N: 4875] (16757)
Another specimen
Edited by:sandpiper2 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 1906 W: 107 N: 4875] (16757)

A closer view of the second specimen showing the pitted structure of the fruiting body. 1/13 sec, f2.7.